AI Bulletin - 300kph AI Supercar

AI Bulletin – 300kph AI Supercar

In AI Bulletin – 300kph AI supercar we look at artificial intelligence updates, including Roborace’s 300kph AI Supercar, persuading a robot you should get a job, growth in Robotics, Vision and Motion Control Industries, transcribing meetings in real-time, and legal AI outperforming humans.

Roborace is building a 300kph AI supercar – no driver required

Sverdlov hopes to get ten cars and teams competing against each other. The plan is for Roborace to build identical Robocars and a foundation for the AI that controls them; teams will develop their own “drivers”. “We’ll end up with the format where one driver will be compared to another one,” Sverdlov says. Bragging points go to developers that show their artificial intelligence to be superior.

Read more at WIRED

How to persuade a robot that you should get the job

Jobseekers are forced to prepare for whatever format a prospective employer has chosen, a familiar power shift in the gig economy era. And without human interaction or feedback, an already difficult process has become deeply alienating.

Read more at The Guardian

Robotics, Vision and Motion Control Industries Set New Growth Records in 2017

The amount of robots sold in North America last year surpassed all previous records. Customers purchased 34,904 total units representing $1.9 billion in total sales. These numbers show growth of 0.9% in units and 0.1% in dollars from 2016. While automotive-related orders were down compared to the previous year (-7.3% in units and -3.8% in dollars), non-automotive orders fueled the rise in 2017 with 20.5% growth in units and 7.3% in dollars.

The industry also set records for North American shipments in 2017: 33,575 robots valued at $1.94 billion shipped to customers last year. This is an expansion of 8.7% in units and 6.9% in dollars over 2016 levels, with non-automotive related shipments once again providing the growth. 2017 shipments increased 29.7% in units and 19.7% in dollars from 2016 results. The largest growth rates for units shipped came from the plastics and rubber (59.6%), metals (53.9%), and food & consumer goods (44.2%). Automotive shipments were flat in both units and dollars compared to 2016.

Read more at Quality Magazine

AI breakthrough: Otter.ai app can transcribe your meetings in real time, for free

When we sat down to talk about it in a tiny meeting room in the back corner of Fira Barcelona’s Hall 2, Sam Liang placed his iPhone on the table and tapped the record button in the Otter app. As the CEO of AISense–the company behind Otter.ai–Liang started explaining how the 15-person startup from Los Altos, CA took a different approach to understand audio data than Amazon Alexa, Google Assistant, and the other companies working on speech recognition.

As Liang gave his pitch, Otter started spitting out text–with roughly a 2-3 second delay. And since Liang had set up our meeting in the app beforehand, the software automatically recognized when his teammate Seamus McAteer chimed in with his own comments or I interrupted with follow-up questions.

Read more at ZDNet

The Verdict Is In: AI Outperforms Human Lawyers in Reviewing Legal Documents

After two months of testing, the results were in: the AI finished the test with an average accuracy rating of 94 percent, while the lawyers achieved an average of 85 percent. The AI’s highest accuracy rating on an individual test was 100 percent, while the highest rating a human lawyer achieved on a single contract was 97 percent.

As far as accuracy goes, the study showed that humans can (for the most part) keep up with AI in reviewing contracts. The same couldn’t be said when it came to speed, however.

On average, the lawyers took 92 minutes to finish reviewing the contracts. The longest time taken by an individual lawyer was 156 minutes and the shortest 51 minutes.

LawGeex’s AI, on the other hand, only needed 26 seconds.

Read more at Futurism


See other Artificial Intelligence Bulletin articles.

AI Bulletin - 300kph AI Supercar

AI Bulletin – 300kph AI Supercar

In AI Bulletin – 300kph AI supercar we look at artificial intelligence updates, including Roborace’s 300kph AI Supercar, persuading a robot you should get a job, growth in Robotics, Vision and Motion Control Industries, transcribing meetings in real-time, and legal AI outperforming humans.

Roborace is building a 300kph AI supercar – no driver required

Sverdlov hopes to get ten cars and teams competing against each other. The plan is for Roborace to build identical Robocars and a foundation for the AI that controls them; teams will develop their own “drivers”. “We’ll end up with the format where one driver will be compared to another one,” Sverdlov says. Bragging points go to developers that show their artificial intelligence to be superior.

Read more at WIRED

How to persuade a robot that you should get the job

Jobseekers are forced to prepare for whatever format a prospective employer has chosen, a familiar power shift in the gig economy era. And without human interaction or feedback, an already difficult process has become deeply alienating.

Read more at The Guardian

Robotics, Vision and Motion Control Industries Set New Growth Records in 2017

The amount of robots sold in North America last year surpassed all previous records. Customers purchased 34,904 total units representing $1.9 billion in total sales. These numbers show growth of 0.9% in units and 0.1% in dollars from 2016. While automotive-related orders were down compared to the previous year (-7.3% in units and -3.8% in dollars), non-automotive orders fueled the rise in 2017 with 20.5% growth in units and 7.3% in dollars.

The industry also set records for North American shipments in 2017: 33,575 robots valued at $1.94 billion shipped to customers last year. This is an expansion of 8.7% in units and 6.9% in dollars over 2016 levels, with non-automotive related shipments once again providing the growth. 2017 shipments increased 29.7% in units and 19.7% in dollars from 2016 results. The largest growth rates for units shipped came from the plastics and rubber (59.6%), metals (53.9%), and food & consumer goods (44.2%). Automotive shipments were flat in both units and dollars compared to 2016.

Read more at Quality Magazine

AI breakthrough: Otter.ai app can transcribe your meetings in real time, for free

When we sat down to talk about it in a tiny meeting room in the back corner of Fira Barcelona’s Hall 2, Sam Liang placed his iPhone on the table and tapped the record button in the Otter app. As the CEO of AISense–the company behind Otter.ai–Liang started explaining how the 15-person startup from Los Altos, CA took a different approach to understand audio data than Amazon Alexa, Google Assistant, and the other companies working on speech recognition.

As Liang gave his pitch, Otter started spitting out text–with roughly a 2-3 second delay. And since Liang had set up our meeting in the app beforehand, the software automatically recognized when his teammate Seamus McAteer chimed in with his own comments or I interrupted with follow-up questions.

Read more at ZDNet

The Verdict Is In: AI Outperforms Human Lawyers in Reviewing Legal Documents

After two months of testing, the results were in: the AI finished the test with an average accuracy rating of 94 percent, while the lawyers achieved an average of 85 percent. The AI’s highest accuracy rating on an individual test was 100 percent, while the highest rating a human lawyer achieved on a single contract was 97 percent.

As far as accuracy goes, the study showed that humans can (for the most part) keep up with AI in reviewing contracts. The same couldn’t be said when it came to speed, however.

On average, the lawyers took 92 minutes to finish reviewing the contracts. The longest time taken by an individual lawyer was 156 minutes and the shortest 51 minutes.

LawGeex’s AI, on the other hand, only needed 26 seconds.

Read more at Futurism


See other Artificial Intelligence Bulletin articles.