Cryonics – Maybe You’ll Live Again?

Posted By on June 21, 2016

Screen Shot 2016-06-21 at 5.07.15 AM

In ‘Cryonics – Maybe You’ll Live Again?’ we look at the fascinating process that Alcor uses to cryo-preserve its customers after death.

In our times there have been great women and men that have advanced humanity forward through both science and the arts. Imagine if we could preserve the minds of the greatest contributors to humanity and eventually bring them back once we have advanced technology to do so. I’d love to see a future advisory council consisting of thousands of the greatest minds from around the world helping current thinkers and administrators make the world a better place. The next step for the big tech players? Absolutely.

What is Cryonics?

Cryonics is an experimental procedure that preserves a human being using the best available technology for the purpose of saving his/her life. We believe medical technology will advance further in coming decades than it has in the past several centuries, enabling it to heal damage at the cellular and molecular levels and to restore full physical and mental health (from Alcor).

How Does Cryonics Work?

Last month Singularity Weblog had the privilege of visiting Max More at the Alcor Life Extension Foundation. Alcor is a non-profit organization founded in 1972 and located in Scottsdale, Arizona. It is the world leader in cryonics, cryonics research, and cryonics technology.

During their visit CEO Dr. More walked us through the Alcor facilities as well as the process starting after clinical death is proclaimed, through the cooling of the body and its vitrification, and ending in long term storage.

Here is a list of some of the people that have already been preserved.

***

Nikolas Badminton is a world-respected futurist speaker that researches, speaks, and writes about the future of work, how technology is affecting the workplace, how workers are adapting, the sharing economy, and how the world is evolving. He appears at conferences in Canada, USA, UK, and Europe. Email him to book him for your radio, TV show, or conference.

 


Like the story? Post comment using disqus.

  • Roberta

    Unfortunately, in Europe we’re at a stand-still about Cryonics. I just hope many more effective initiatives will flourish in the next years.