future of cyborg musicians

Future of Cyborg Musicians

The boundaries of creativity and new world interaction using music is starting to belong to those that embrace the future of cyborg musicians. A world where technology melds with biology and provides an interface that you control with movement and physical expression.

Here we show a number of performers, researchers and projects that epitomize the modern field of wearable tech cyborg musicians.

Imogen Heap’s Mi.Mu gloves will “change the way we make music”

Musician Imogen Heap invited the Dezeen magazine team into her home-studio to film this exclusive demonstration of her Mi.Mu gesture-control gloves, which allow her to control instruments and computers on stage by using hand gestures.
For the first time I get to see how somebody else uses the gloves,” Heap told us. “The minute somebody puts their hands in them, they’re starting to think creatively about them. I’m really happy that you’re going to see what they’re up to.

Les Gestes / Gestures

The Input Devices and Music Interaction Laboratory (IDMIL) in the Music Technology Area of McGill University have been researching next-generation digital musical instruments that defines the future of cyborg musicians through choreographed dancers. Les Gestes resulted in the creation of a new large-scale collaborative work for musicians and dancers incorporating the scientific and technological developments.

The project was based on expertise the team members had developed partly through the Digital Orchestra Project. Utilizing this expertise they identified a number of significant new opportunities for digital musical instrument design.

The Human Harp

Artist Di Mainstone has plans to transform New York’s Brooklyn Bridge with the Human Harp, an instrumental sculpture that allows pedestrians to physically ‘play’ the bridge.
The body-centric Harp is a collaborative project supported by Queen Mary University of London. Human Harp connects the human body to the instrument-like architecture of existing structures and enables pedestrians and dancers to interact in the translation of journey into musical composition.

Nikolas Badminton is the CEO of EXPONENTIAL MINDS and an award-winning Futurist Keynote Speaker, researcher and author. His expertise and thought leadership will guide you from complacency to thinking exponentially, planning for longevity, and encouraging a culture of innovation. You will then establish resiliency and abundance in your organization. Please reach out to discuss how he can help you, and read on to see what is happening in the world this week.

Please SUBSCRIBE to Nikolas’ Youtube channel so that you don’t miss any as they come up. You can see more of his thoughts on Linkedin and Twitter.

future of cyborg musicians

Future of Cyborg Musicians

The boundaries of creativity and new world interaction using music is starting to belong to those that embrace the future of cyborg musicians. A world where technology melds with biology and provides an interface that you control with movement and physical expression.

Here we show a number of performers, researchers and projects that epitomize the modern field of wearable tech cyborg musicians.

Imogen Heap’s Mi.Mu gloves will “change the way we make music”

Musician Imogen Heap invited the Dezeen magazine team into her home-studio to film this exclusive demonstration of her Mi.Mu gesture-control gloves, which allow her to control instruments and computers on stage by using hand gestures.
For the first time I get to see how somebody else uses the gloves,” Heap told us. “The minute somebody puts their hands in them, they’re starting to think creatively about them. I’m really happy that you’re going to see what they’re up to.

Les Gestes / Gestures

The Input Devices and Music Interaction Laboratory (IDMIL) in the Music Technology Area of McGill University have been researching next-generation digital musical instruments that defines the future of cyborg musicians through choreographed dancers. Les Gestes resulted in the creation of a new large-scale collaborative work for musicians and dancers incorporating the scientific and technological developments.

The project was based on expertise the team members had developed partly through the Digital Orchestra Project. Utilizing this expertise they identified a number of significant new opportunities for digital musical instrument design.

The Human Harp

Artist Di Mainstone has plans to transform New York’s Brooklyn Bridge with the Human Harp, an instrumental sculpture that allows pedestrians to physically ‘play’ the bridge.
The body-centric Harp is a collaborative project supported by Queen Mary University of London. Human Harp connects the human body to the instrument-like architecture of existing structures and enables pedestrians and dancers to interact in the translation of journey into musical composition.

Nikolas Badminton is the CEO of EXPONENTIAL MINDS and an award-winning Futurist Keynote Speaker, researcher and author. His expertise and thought leadership will guide you from complacency to thinking exponentially, planning for longevity, and encouraging a culture of innovation. You will then establish resiliency and abundance in your organization. Please reach out to discuss how he can help you, and read on to see what is happening in the world this week.

Please SUBSCRIBE to Nikolas’ Youtube channel so that you don’t miss any as they come up. You can see more of his thoughts on Linkedin and Twitter.