Artificial Intelligence Bulletin – Chatbot vs. parking tickets

Posted By on June 29, 2016

Screen Shot 2016-06-28 at 11.24.39 AM

Each week on a Wednesday Nikolas Badminton, Futurist highlights the top stories from the past week relating to the incredible rise of artificial intelligence and its application in society, the workplace, in cities, and in our lives.

In Artificial Intelligence Bulletin – Chatbot vs. parking tickets we see posts on chatbot lawyers winning for the people, AI dogfights, TV prediction and why the Singularity may not be here until 2080.

Chatbot lawyer overturns 160,000 parking tickets in London and New York

An artificial-intelligence lawyer chatbot has successfully contested 160,000 parking tickets across London and New York for free, showing that chatbots can actually be useful.

Dubbed as “the world’s first robot lawyer” by its 19-year-old creator, London-born second-year Stanford University student Joshua Browder, DoNotPay helps users contest parking tickets in an easy to use chat-like interface.

The program first works out whether an appeal is possible through a series of simple questions, such as were there clearly visible parking signs, and then guides users through the appeals process.

The results speak for themselves. In the 21 months since the free service was launched in London and now New York, Browder says DoNotPay has taken on 250,000 cases and won 160,000, giving it a success rate of 64% appealing over $4m of parking tickets.

“I think the people getting parking tickets are the most vulnerable in society. These people aren’t looking to break the law. I think they’re being exploited as a revenue source by the local government,” Browder told Venture Beat.

Read more at The Guardian

Raspberry Pi-powered AI beats human pilot in dogfight

LISA VENTRE, UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI

When the Raspberry Pi computer was first launched in 2012 to promote the teaching of computer science, its creators probably didn’t imagine the $35 device would one day take on a professional fighter pilot in a dogfight—and win.

But that is exactly what a doctoral graduate at the University of Cincinnati set out to do when he built a Pi-powered artificial intelligence pilot. The AI, dubbed ALPHA, went up against retired United States Air Force Colonel Gene Lee in a series of simulated battles, beating Lee in every single engagement.

Lee described ALPHA as “the most aggressive, responsive, dynamic and credible AI I’ve seen to date.”

Read more at Newsweek

An MIT Algorithm Predicts the Future by Watching TV

TV shows and video clips can help artificially intelligent systems learn about and anticipate human interactions, according to MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. Researchers created an algorithm that analyzes video, then uses what it learns to predict how humans will behave.

Six-hundred hours of clips from shows like The Office andBig Bang Theory let the AI learned to identify high-fives, handshakes, hugs, and kisses. Then it learned what the moments leading to those interactions looked like.

After the AI devoured all that video to train itself, the researchers fed the algorithm a single frame from a video it had not seen and tasked it with predicting what would happen next. The algorithm got it right about 43 percent of the time.

Read more at WIRED

The Brain vs Deep Learning Part I: Computational Complexity — Or Why the Singularity Is Nowhere Near

My model shows that it can be estimated that the brain operates at least 10x^21 operations per second. With current rates of growth in computational power we could achieve supercomputers with brain-like capabilities by the year 2037, but estimates after the year 2080 seem more realistic when all evidence is taken into account. This estimate only holds true if we succeed to stomp limitations like physical barriers (for example quantum-tunneling), capital costs for semiconductor fabrication plants, and growing electrical costs. At the same time we constantly need to innovate to solve memory bandwidth and network bandwidth problems which are or will be the bottlenecks in supercomputing. With these considerations taken into account, it is practically rather unlikely that we will achieve human-like processing capabilities anytime soon.

Read this great, and very comprehensive article, at Tim Dettmers’ blog

***

Nikolas Badminton is a world-respected futurist speaker that researches, speaks, and writes about the future of work, how technology is affecting the workplace, how workers are adapting, the sharing economy, and how the world is evolving. He appears at conferences in Canada, USA, UK, and Europe. Email him to book him for your radio, TV show, or conference.


Like the story? Post comment using disqus.